Stand Up for Boating and Fishing Access in the Atlantic

Please take one minute today to email your members of Congress this new pre-written letter regarding NOAA Fisheries’ proposed 10-knot vessel speed restrictions in the Atlantic Ocean. Raising awareness on Capitol Hill is crucial to implementing more practical solutions to protecting the North Atlantic right whale.

NOAA Fisheries is finalizing new vessel speed restrictions that stretch from Massachusetts to Florida in an effort to protect North Atlantic right whales. This could be the most extreme federal regulation ever imposed on the recreational fishing and boating community.

If finalized, vessels 35 feet and larger would have to travel 10 knots (11.5 mph) or slower on essentially the entire Atlantic Coast for as long as seven months of the year. This rule was developed largely behind closed doors without stakeholder input from the recreational fishing and boating community.

As America’s original conservationists, recreational anglers and boaters understand the importance of protecting North Atlantic right whales. However, NOAA’s proposal is classic government overreach – missing the mark on conservation while severely limiting access to the open ocean. This rule puts in jeopardy 340,000 American jobs and nearly $84 billion in important economic activity in Atlantic coastal states alone.

Please take one minute today to send this pre-written letter to your representatives in Washington, D.C. We need them to support language in this year’s Appropriations bill that focuses on the development and implementation of a technology-driven solution to track and monitor North Atlantic right whales to minimize the risk of vessel strikes.

About

The Center for Sportfishing Policy works to maximize opportunity for saltwater recreational anglers by organizing, focusing and engaging recreational fishing stakeholders to speak with one voice to shape federal marine fisheries management policy. For more information on CSP and its partners, visit www.SportfishingPolicy.com.