Seems like time for another rant … or two. I’ll keep them short.

As I put together issues of Fishing Tackle Retailer magazine, I reach out to a lot — hundreds — of manufacturers trying to get information (and photos) of their new products. Part of our challenge and purpose at FTR is to keep you apprised of what’s coming down the pike so you’ll know what’s available for your store. Along with the old standards, it’s critical to have some new stuff, too. After all, you can’t sell a customer something he already has.

Well, to get you this information, we need things like product descriptions and high-resolution images. The descriptions range from fantastic to just awful, but I pretty much know what I’m going to get based on who’s sending it. Some companies are good at that stuff, others … well, they’re nice people, I’m sure.

Rant One: Photo Labels

But photos! Photos are a challenge at all levels of our industry — top to bottom, big to small. I’ve mostly gotten past the issue of not getting high-resolution images; manufacturers are savvy to that, now. My problem is smaller, but somehow almost as annoying.

I rarely get images that are conveniently labelled.

In the past week, I’ve received photographic images from major tackle manufacturers that were named 20170323-140830.jpg, 19007.jpg, 323.jpg and dozens of similar names.

Why?

Why can’t they simply rename the file for me so that I don’t lose it, mis-caption it or otherwise screw it up for them? If the bait is a Whiz Bang Golly Whomper, it’s actually very easy to give the file that exact name. That way I know what it is. Remember, these are new products. I’ve never seen them before. I don’t know the difference between a Whiz Bang Golly Whomper and a Lou’s Lures Thing-a-ma-lou. Do you want me to guess?

I didn’t think so.

Rant Two: Multitasking

Of course, one rant is never enough, so I have another. This one is directed at me as much as anyone else, but you may find it applies to you, too.

I’m a pretty lousy multitasker, and I suspect that I’m not alone. Every study — and I mean every study — seems to clearly indicate that we are not good multitaskers as a species. We’re far better off taking on one task to its completion before beginning another.

Shifting between tasks takes time — time to redirect your attention, time to reorient yourself to the other problem, etc., etc. Before you know it, it took longer to do the two tasks than it would have to do them separately … and they weren’t done as well. There were probably lots of mistakes.

So why do so many people want to tell me how great they are at multitasking? I know I’m not, and everything I’ve ever read says that no one else is, either.

It’s time to start monotasking, and I’m certain it’s going to make me faster, better and more efficient.

Please don’t distract me by telling me how good you are at multitasking.

About The Author

Ken Duke
Managing Editor

Ken Duke is the Managing Editor of Fishing Tackle Retailer Magazine, most recently serving as Senior Editor of B.A.S.S. Publications (2005-14). Before that he served as B.A.S.S.’ Senior Publicist (2004-05) and as an editor with Game & Fish Publications (1999-2004). He is the author of two books on bass fishing and has been published in more than 50 regional and national outdoor magazines.

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